The Best Movie Songs That Made Film History

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Sometimes the link between a movie and a song on its soundtrack can be unbreakable: a double-stranded bond is created such that when taken individually, a song can trigger in mind the memory of the movie to which it is linked, and vice versa. Let’s find out the most famous movie songs that have made history.

1. Singin’ in the Rain – Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

Among the songs that have made movie history and are among the best known even to those not fans of musicals, it is impossible not to mention Singin’ in the Rain, one of the top songs in Singin’ in the Rain.

Composed by Nacio Herb Brown and written by Arthur Freed (the man who in MGM headed the very unit dedicated to the making of musicals), this song was made in 1929, and after a few performances (including one by Judy Garland), in 1952, it was included in the soundtrack of Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly’s movie to represent the happiness of the main character Don Lockwood, in love and with a safeguarded film career.

2. Over the Rainbow – The Wizard of Oz (1939)

We have always hoped to go over the rainbow at least once. Thus, Over the Rainbow (among the most famous songs used in movies) has become an anthem of hope: Sung by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz, this song has become one of the best-known songs in the film world and has also been one of the most covered songs ever.

From 1939 (when The Wizard of Oz was released) to the present, this song – with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg – continues to be sung and whispered to give us hope and to imagine that there may be what we seek beyond the rainbow.

2. Singin’ in the Rain – Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

Among the songs that have made movie history and are among the best known even to those not fans of musicals, it is impossible not to mention Singin’ in the Rain, one of the top songs in Singin’ in the Rain.

Composed by Nacio Herb Brown and written by Arthur Freed (the man who in MGM headed the very unit dedicated to the making of musicals), this song was made in 1929, and after a few performances (including one by Judy Garland), in 1952, it was included in the soundtrack of Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly’s movie to represent the happiness of the main character Don Lockwood, in love and with a safeguarded film career.

3. Moon River – Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

The soundtrack to Breakfast at Tiffany’s is one of the best known, and among the various songs featured, Moon River is the one that has stayed most in the collective imagination. Made by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer and performed by Audrey Hepburn, the song was written specifically for the film and became so famous that it was reinterpreted numerous times over the years, as well as winning an Academy Award for Best Song.

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4. Stayin’ Alive – Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Among the many songs that helped make a film like Saturday Night Fever famous, it is impossible to forget Stayin’ Alive. Written and performed by the Bee Gees from 1977 (the year the song and the film it was part of were released) to the present, it has remained one of the English group’s most famous songs, as well as in the history of international music. It has also become a favorite evergreen track in disco music.

5. Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friends – Men Prefer Blondes (1953)

Written by Leo Robin, with music by Jule Styne, and performed by Marilyn Monroe, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” is the title track of Men Prefer Blondes. This song was so successful that it was re-released several times with different adaptations, such as Nicole Kidman’s performance in Moulin Rouge or the rearrangement of the film Burlesque.

6. My Heart Will Go On – Titanic (1997)

We have heard it so many times that we know it by heart by now, suffice it to say that even Céline Dion would get tired of singing it because of the many requests she has received over the years. Needless to say, My Heart Will Go On is the lead song from Titanic, James Cameron’s film released in 1997, with music by James Horner and lyrics by Will Jennings. It is a song that inevitably linked Céline Dion’s career and the success of Titanic inextricably, for, perhaps, it would not have been the same without it.

7. Flashdance… What a Feeling – Flashdance (1983)

Keeping your feet at bay while listening to “Flashdance… What a Feeling” is virtually impossible. This song, which helped make famous one of the most-watched movies of the 1980s, namely Flashdance, has made feet dance halfway around the world thanks to its rhythm and the energy it instills in the listener.

Based on music by Giorgio Moroder and lyrics by Keith Forsey and Irene Cara, the song-which won both a Golden Globe and an Academy Award for Best Song-is sung by the latter and can be found both at the beginning of the film and during the protagonist Alex’s audition.

8. Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Among the many pieces of music that helped make an animated film like Beauty and the Beast famous, it is impossible to forget Beauty and the Beast, the film’s title track. Based on Alan Menken’s music and Howard Ashman’s lyrics, the song is also famous for being sung by world-famous actress Angela Lansbury, formerly the voice actress of the enchanted teapot Mrs. Bric.

The song follows the evolution of the feelings of the two main characters, Belle and a la the Beast, during the famous ball in the castle library. However, it was later reprised to serve as the background to the movie’s epilogue and as the title track of the end credits.

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